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Tag: Idioms

Chase Rainbows – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 18, 2021 at 11:08 am   /   Spoken, Vocabulary

Chase Rainbows – Idiom of the Day Meaning: When someone is pursuing fanciful or unrealistic goals, he is said to be chasing rainbows. Origin: The term comes from the old tale about finding a pot of gold if one digs at the end of the rainbow, where it touches earth. Obviously, no such thing exists. So […]

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A plum job – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 17, 2021 at 10:41 am   /   Spoken

A plum job – Idiom of the Day Meaning: A good job which is well-paid and relatively easy. Origin: It is said that “plum” in the 17th century was slang for £1000, a very large sum indeed in those times. This use was then applied to some political jobs, thought by the man in the […]

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All dressed up and nowhere to go – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 15, 2021 at 3:48 pm   /   Spoken

All dressed up and nowhere to go – Idiom of the Day Meaning: Fashionably or smartly dressed for an anticipated occasion that does not take place. Ready for an event or occasion that has since been canceled. Prepared for action but having nothing to do or unable to be proceeded with. Origin: The initial version […]

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A Little Bird Told Me – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 13, 2021 at 1:24 pm   /   Spoken

A Little Bird Told Me – Idiom of the Day (Also A Little Birdie Told Me) Meaning: This idiom is used to convey that the speaker knows something but chooses to(or has to) keep the identity of their informant secret. Origin: There are multiple possible origin stories for this expression.  Some attribute it to Ecclesiastes 10:20 […]

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Cold Turkey – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 7, 2021 at 9:39 am   /   Spoken

Cold Turkey – Idiom of the Day Meaning: Completely and abruptly stopping a habit as opposed to phasing it out of your life. Usually used to refer to a bad habit or an addiction. Origin: The expression first appeared in 1921 in the Daily Colonist in British Columbia. In that period, the phrase was related to quitting […]

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Bob’s Your Uncle – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 5, 2021 at 4:09 pm   /   Uncategorized

Bob’s Your Uncle – Idiom of the Day Meaning: This is an informal British expression which conveys how easy it is to achieve a certain task. Origin: No one knows for sure, but a common origin story is that the expression arose after the British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, (“Bob”) appointed his nephew Arthur Balfour […]

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Deaf as a doornail – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 4, 2021 at 2:22 pm   /   Spoken

Meaning: Used to mock someone that they are nearly deaf. Someone who is deaf as a doornail is someone who is, or is accused of being, almost completely if not completely deaf. It’s also related to other similar expressions such as deaf as a post, deaf as a doorpost, and deaf as a doorknob History: History dates back to the 13th century. In those […]

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Idiom: Find your feet

Posted: October 9, 2019 at 6:06 pm   /   Vocabulary

Idiom: Find Your Feet to become confident in a new situation, especially one that is difficult at first. Rob is still finding his feet as a coach. I don’t know anyone in England but I am sure I will manage when I find my feet. I asked Robert if I could stay with him till I […]

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