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Don’t spare the horses – Idiom of the Day

Don’t spare the horses – Idiom of the Day
Posted: January 4, 2021 at 2:37 pm   /   by   /   comments (0)

Don’t spare the horses – Idiom of the Day

Meaning:

Urging someone to speed up on something that they are doing.

Whenever you hear someone add don’t spare the horses to a directive, what you’ve heard is someone being told to hurry up with what they’re doing. It’s not a negative statement, but rather, one that expresses the importance of speeding things up rather than continuing at the current pace.

History:

History dates back to the 17th century when the idiom was first used. In the 1860s, there are some references to the idiom being used in magazines. In 1934, there was a famous song in the name of the idiom. There is also evidence of the idiom being cited in a novel in 1969.

Idiom scenarios:

Scenario 1:

Friend 1: We need to reach Delhi by 2:00 PM.
Friend 2: With the speed that we’re traveling, it will be late evening when we reach the hotel there.
Friend 1: We should have got on a flight.
Friend 2: But there were no tickets available.
Friend 1 ( to the car driver): Make it fast. Don’t spare the horses.

Scenario 2:

Friend 1: I’m preparing for the maths exam. I’m the second chapter. There are six more to go.
Friend 2: I’m already in the 7th chapter.
Friend 1: What shall I do now?
Friend 2: Read fast, don’t spare the horses.

Scenario 3:

Director ( movie): Our movie is due for release next month.
Music director: The notes and music troops are ready. The singers are practising.
Director ( movie): The movie has to hit the screens by next month. Work fast, and don’t spare the horses.

Examples:

Go through the examples to understand the usage of the idiom:

1. “This case needs to be closed soon. Speed up the investigation. Don’t spare the horses.
2. They need to get the loan sanctioned next month. Hurry up! And don’t spare the horses.
3. The election is fast approaching. Speed up the plans for the campaign and don’t spare the horses.

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