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Spoken

Perfunctory – Word of the Day

Posted: January 18, 2021 at 11:10 am   /   Grammar, Spoken, Vocabulary

Perfunctory – Word of the Day Meaning: Lacking in interest or effortSuperficial or routine Origin: Perfunctory is a word whose origins can be found entirely in Latin. The word first appeared in English in the late 16th century, and comes from the Late Latin word perfunctorius, meaning “done in a careless or superficial manner,”. Another possible […]

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Chase Rainbows – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 18, 2021 at 11:08 am   /   Spoken, Vocabulary

Chase Rainbows – Idiom of the Day Meaning: When someone is pursuing fanciful or unrealistic goals, he is said to be chasing rainbows. Origin: The term comes from the old tale about finding a pot of gold if one digs at the end of the rainbow, where it touches earth. Obviously, no such thing exists. So […]

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Lackadaisical – Word of the Day

Posted: January 17, 2021 at 10:50 am   /   Spoken, Vocabulary

Lackadaisical – Word of the Day Meaning: Lacking enthusiasm, zest and determination; carelessly lazy. Origin: There are times when life seems to be one unfortunate occurrence after another. We’ve all had days when everything was going wrong. When someone had such a day back in the 17th century, people would say “Lackaday” to express their […]

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A plum job – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 17, 2021 at 10:41 am   /   Spoken

A plum job – Idiom of the Day Meaning: A good job which is well-paid and relatively easy. Origin: It is said that “plum” in the 17th century was slang for £1000, a very large sum indeed in those times. This use was then applied to some political jobs, thought by the man in the […]

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All dressed up and nowhere to go – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 15, 2021 at 3:48 pm   /   Spoken

All dressed up and nowhere to go – Idiom of the Day Meaning: Fashionably or smartly dressed for an anticipated occasion that does not take place.Ready for an event or occasion that has since been canceled.Prepared for action but having nothing to do or unable to be proceeded with. Origin: The initial version of the […]

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Berate – Word of the Day

Posted: January 13, 2021 at 1:26 pm   /   Spoken

Berate – Word of the Day Meaning: Scold or criticise someone in anger Origin: This word traces its origin back to the mid-16th century. It is a compound of two words: be-(meaning “thoroughly”), and rate. Here the origins are a bit hazy. It’s possible that rate – and by extension berate – comes from the same ancient word that […]

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A Little Bird Told Me – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 13, 2021 at 1:24 pm   /   Spoken

A Little Bird Told Me – Idiom of the Day (Also A Little Birdie Told Me) Meaning: This idiom is used to convey that the speaker knows something but chooses to(or has to) keep the identity of their informant secret. Origin: There are multiple possible origin stories for this expression.  Some attribute it to Ecclesiastes 10:20 […]

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Cerulean – Word of the Day

Posted: January 11, 2021 at 10:38 am   /   Grammar, IELTS, Spoken, Vocabulary

Cerulean – Word of the Day Meaning: A deep sky-blue colour. Origin: This word dates back to the mid 17th century. It comes from the Latin word caeruleus, meaning “sky-blue”. In turn, caeruleus originates from the Latin word caelum, meaning “sky”. Usage: I’m thinking of painting the walls of my living room in cerulean blue, to remind myself of my vacation in Santorini.The […]

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Cold Turkey – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 7, 2021 at 9:39 am   /   Spoken

Cold Turkey – Idiom of the Day Meaning: Completely and abruptly stopping a habit as opposed to phasing it out of your life. Usually used to refer to a bad habit or an addiction. Origin: The expression first appeared in 1921 in the Daily Colonist in British Columbia. In that period, the phrase was related to quitting […]

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Describe a method to save money. IELTS CUE CARD 2021

Posted: January 6, 2021 at 3:44 pm   /   CUE CARDS, IELTS, IELTS CUE CARD 2021, Speaking Part 1, Speaking Part 2, Spoken

Describe a method to save money. IELTS CUE CARD 2021 You should say: what the method is? when did you start to use it? how you knew it and explain why it is helpful? Answer Well, I’m not good at saving money and I tend to buy things without careful consideration. It’s hard to save if […]

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Common English Words Used in IELTS Speaking

Posted: January 6, 2021 at 2:40 pm   /   IELTS, Speaking Part 1, Speaking Part 2, Spoken, Vocabulary

Common English Words Used in IELTS Speaking IELTS Speaking module is for 15 minutes. You have to impress the examiner within this short period. To be able to do this, you should talk spontaneously. If you make frequent pauses because you’re in search of the right words, spontaneity goes for a toss. You will be […]

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Tips to Answer Yes/No Questions in IELTS Speaking

Posted: January 6, 2021 at 2:34 pm   /   IELTS, Speaking Part 1, Speaking Part 2, Spoken

Yes/No questions are often asked during the IELTS speaking test. IELTS candidates can answer these questions with a simple Yes or No. However, this way of answering Y/N questions doesn’t help them score high in IELTS Speaking at all. Therefore, this lesson covers 6 types of Yes/No questions and how to respond to this kind of question […]

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Don’t spare the horses – Idiom of the Day

Posted: January 4, 2021 at 2:37 pm   /   Business English, Spoken

Don’t spare the horses – Idiom of the Day Meaning: Urging someone to speed up on something that they are doing. Whenever you hear someone add don’t spare the horses to a directive, what you’ve heard is someone being told to hurry up with what they’re doing. It’s not a negative statement, but rather, one that expresses […]

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Fetid – Word of the day

Posted: January 4, 2021 at 2:32 pm   /   Business English, Grammar, Spoken, Vocabulary

Meaning: [adj]: smelling extremely unpleasant. malodorous, stinking, fetid, noisome, putrid, rank, fusty, musty mean bad-smelling. malodorous may range from the unpleasant to the strongly offensive. malodorous fertilizers stinking and fetid suggest the foul or disgusting. History: Dates back to the early 15th century. Has Latin origin. From Latin fetidus. Usage: Noun examples – Fetidity, Fetidness: 1. Due to the fetidness […]

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Garrulous – Word of the day

Posted: January 4, 2021 at 2:30 pm   /   Business English, Grammar, Spoken, Vocabulary

Meaning: [adj]: excessively talkative, especially on trivial matters. History: Dates back to the 1600s. Has Latin origin. Greek origin and Irish origin are also suspected. From Latin garrulus, Greek Gerys and Irish Gairm. Usage: Adverb examples – Garrulously: 1. The TV host won many viewers by talking garrulously.2. She diverted the focus by garrulously explaining some […]

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