Newsletter subscribe

ANSWER

The Nature of Genius ANSWER

Posted: March 26, 2019 at 7:12 pm   /   by   /   comments (0)

Solution for: The Nature of Genius

Answer Table

1. B, C, F, H, J IN ANY ORDER 8. FALSE
2. B, C, F, H, J IN ANY ORDER 9. TRUE
3. B, C, F, H, J IN ANY ORDER 10. TRUE
4. B, C, F, H, J IN ANY ORDER 11. NOT GIVEN
5. B, C, F, H, J IN ANY ORDER 12. TRUE
6. TRUE 13. NOT GIVEN
7. TRUE

Questions 1 – 5, choose FIVE letters, A – K
ANSWER: B, C, F, H, J

Most of the popular beliefs about genius and giftedness are mentioned in paragraph 2

A.   Truly gifted people are talented in all areas.
In paragraph 2: “it is popularly believed that if people are talented in one area, they must be defective in another”. That means they are unable to be talented in all areas.  FALSE
– defective: having a fault or faults; not perfect or complete

B.   The talents of geniuses are soon exhausted.
In  paragraph  2,  “…  that  intellectuals  are  impractical,  that  prodigies  burn  too  brightly too soon and burn out”.
– burn out = exhausted
– prodigies = [young] talents
This means that the talents of geniuses soon burn out/are exhausted  TRUE

C.   Gifted people should use their gifts
“that people with gifts have a responsibility to use them [their gifts]”  TRUE

D.  A genius appears once in every generation                   NOT GIVEN

E.   Genius can be easily destroyed by discouragement  NOT GIVEN

F.   Genius is inherited
In  paragraph  2:  “…that  genius  runs  in  families”.  That  means  genius  is  inherited  from people in their families.  TRUE

G.  Gifted people are very hard to live with  NOT GIVEN

H.  People never appreciate true genius.

“…that genius goes unrecognized and unrewarded” => that means they [geniuses] are not appreciated by other people. TRUE

I.    Geniuses are natural leaders  NOT GIVEN

J.    Gifted people develop their greatness through difficulties.

“….that  adversity  makes  men  wise”  =>that  means  people  [men]  become  wiser  through difficulties.  TRUE

K.   Genius will always reveal itself.
In   paragraph   3,   the   writer   refers   to:   “…the   frequency   with   which   abilities   went unrecognised by teachers and schools”. Therefore, it is not always true that genius is recognized or reveals itself.  FALSE


Questions 19 – 26
19. Nineteenth century studies of the nature of genius failed to take into account the uniqueness of the person‟s upbringing
Key   words:   nineteenth   century   studies,   nature   of   genius,   failed,   take   into   account uniqueness of person‟s upbringing.
In  paragraph  3:  “However,  the  difficulty  with  the  evidence  produced  by  these  studies, fascinating  as  they  are  in  collecting  together  anecdotes  and  apparent  similarities  and exceptions,    is    that    they    are    not    what    we    would    today    call    norm-referenced”.
–  failed to take into account = they are not norm-referenced… we must also take into account
– the uniqueness of the person’s upbringing = information about how common or exceptional
these  circumstances  were  at  the  time.   For  example,  most  studies  were  conducted  among “members of the privileged classes”, but “home tutoring was common in the families of the nobility and wealthy”.   So, studies failed to take into account the education and health of the circumstances of children from a range of social classes – the social norms.
=> ANSWER: TRUE

20. Nineteenth – century studies of genius lacked both objectivity and proper scientific approach.
Key   words:   nineteenth   –   century,   studies   of   genius,   lacked,   objectivity,   proper scientific approach
The  last   sentence  in   paragraph   3:   “It   was   only  with   the   growth   of   paediatrics   and psychology in the twentieth century that studies could be carried out on a more objective, if still not always very scientific, basis”. This means that in the 19th  century studies could not be  conducted  using  an  objective  and  scientific  approach. Studies  only  became  more objective and scientific in the 20th century.
=> ANSWER: TRUE

21. A true genius has general powers capable of excellence in any area.
Key words: true genius, general powers, excellence in any area.
In paragraph 4, the writer notes the idea of Dr Johnson that: “The true genius is a mind of large  general  powers,  accidentally  determined  to  particular  direction.  We  may  disagree with the „general‟, for we doubt if all musicians of genius could have become scientists of genius or vice versa¼”
=>   ANSWER: FALSE

22. The skills of ordinary individuals are in essence the same as the skills of prodigies.
Key words: skills of ordinary individual, the same as, the skills of prodigies.
In paragraph 5: “…the achievements of prodigies are the manifestations ofskills or abilities which are similar to, but also much superior to, our own”. This means that the skills of prodigies are similar to those of ordinary people, but their achievements are much greater. However, “….their minds are not different from our own…”
–  the same as = similar to
=>ANSWER: TRUE

 

23.  The  ease  with  which  truly  great  ideas  are  accepted  and  taken  for  granted  fails  to  lessen  their significance.
Key words: truly great ideas, accepted, taken for granted, fails, lessen their significance.
In paragraph 5, the writer expains that “the hard-won discoveries of scientists like Kepler or  Einstein  become  the  commonplace  knowledge  of  schoolchildren  and  the  colours  of  an artist  like  Paul  Klee  so  soon  appear  on  the  fabrics  we  wear.   This  does  not  minimise  the supremacy of their achievements….”
–   So,   great   ideas/hard-won   discoveries   are   accepted   and   taken   for   granted~   even schoolchildren learn them.  However, the importance of these ideas is not lessened/reduced.
– lessen = minimize
=>  ANSWER: TRUE

24. Giftedness and genius deserve proper scientific research into their true nature so that all talent may be retained for the human race.
Key words: giftedness and genius, deserve, scientific research, true nature, talent, retained for the human race
In the passage, there is no reference to scientific research relating to what genius really is, in  order  for  all  talent  to  be  retained.  In  fact,  in  the  last  paragraph  the  writer  tells  us  that: “Genius and giftedness are relative descriptive terms of no real substance”.
=>  ANSWER: NOT GIVEN

25. Geniuses often pay a high price to achieve greatness
Key words: geniuses, pay high price, achieve greatness
In paragraph 6: “We may envy their achievements and fame, but we should also recognize the price they may have paid in terms of perseverance, single-mindedness ….to make their way to the top”. This  means  that  we  may  feel  jealous  because  some  geniuses  become  famous.  However, they did not achieve this fame without a lot of hard work and determination to succeed.
=>  ANSWER: TRUE

26. To be a genius is worth the high personal cost
Key worth: be a genius, worth, high personal cost
In paragraph 6, the writer only mentions the high price that geniuses may have paid to gain success/  achieve  greatness.  There  is  no  reference  to  whether  all  the  personal  costs  – restrictions  on  their  personal  lives,  demands  on  their  time  and  energy,  for  example  –  are worth the reward of becoming a genius.
=>  ANSWER: NOT GIVEN

Print Friendly, PDF & Email